Nationals celebrate historic World Series win

Locals turn out for parade, players divided over Trump

 

 

With fate dependent upon a Game 7 victory, the Washington Nationals pull through in a 6-2 win against the Houston Astros at Minute Maid Park in Houston, TX., on Oct. 30, making them the 2019 World Series Champions.

Following the win fans took to the streets of Washington D.C. to celebrate the victory with a World Series Parade on Saturday, Nov. 2. The parade began on 15 Street and Constitution Avenue NW, proceeding east, ending at Pennsylvania Avenue and 3 Street NW where the rally followed. 

The Nationals haven’t claimed the World Series title in 95 years, making Saturday’s parade a city-wide party of red. Fans lined the streets in riot comparable fashion, scaling trees, port-o-potties, and even street cars to get a look at busses wrapped with the Nationals logo adorned with players of the team. 

Doris Haizlip, 82 years old, was one of many in attendance of the historical party in our nation’s capital.

“I’m the only girl of six boys, they were all into baseball,” said Haizlip. “Now I like to show my support to my home team.”

The parade featured world series wrapped double-decker busses, local youth baseball teams, Military bands, and even the Budweiser Clydesdales. Following the parade, the rally filled with champagne showers and gracious speeches from team members and officials.

Ted Lerner, Nationals owner, expresses in a speech the impact the love and support for the team’s success.

“It’s not often people look at Washington D.C. and say those guys really love each other.” said Ted Lerner. “But this team, they love each other, and I love all of them.”

Sarah Green, Retired U.S. Government Correspondent Management Analyst, agreed that the parade was good for the city’s divide.

“We have a bad divide in the city so to see everyone come together it was something we needed,” said Green. “It was ‘go Nats’, not this side or that side.” 

 Jordan Zimmerman, the Nationals 2005 first draft pick called Washington the best place to play sports, before embracing his teammates in a group hug.

Amid their 19-31 losing record, the frequent mention of skepticism around a successful feat was presented by the players, the team respectfully admitted to being counted out by industry officials but remained focused on the title though the adversity.

Following the parade, the Nationals made an appearance at Sunday, Nov. 3’s winning Washington Capitals game against the Calgary Flames, at the Capital One Arena in Washington, D.C.

Ending the press for the World Series Champions was a stop at the 1600 block of Pennsylvania Avenue, Monday, Nov. 4, where President Trump hosted a celebratory ceremony on the White House lawn. 

Trump’s ceremony didn’t go unnoticed as critics dismissed it as a political ploy. The event featured Hawaiian native Kurt Suzuki wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat.

“It was a political ploy,” said Green. “He went to the game [Game 5] and they boo’d him [President Trump] he just wanted to host the me show.”

The event also lacked 7 team members including Sean Doolittle, who couldn’t attend because of his role as an ally to the LGBTQ community.

In an interview conducted by The Washington Post, Doolittle shares that his wife, Eireann Dolan, was raised by two mothers and that his absence was important in showing his support for them.

Comradery was achieved throughout D.C.w as the Nationals celebrated their feat, lifting the city from the depths of impeachment talk, but politics weren’t unnoticed among players and fans.

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